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Airliner in flight
Airliner in flight

A New Approach to Aircraft Uptime

A Three-Part Challenge

The aviation industry has always done everything it can to keep aircraft out of the hangar, off the tarmac and in the air. Yet even with all the effort and innovation expended on maximizing uptime, the average airliner operates only 10.5 hours a day. The negative impact this downtime has on budgets and mission capabilities is pushing the industry to find new and better ways of optimizing aircraft uptime.

Increasing uptime requires synchronization across operations. At the highest level, though, maximizing uptime requires doing three basic things:

  • Minimizing unscheduled maintenance
  • Streamlining maintenance operations
  • Reducing aircraft turnaround times

New technologies—such as Connected Aircraft solutions and integrated software sets like Honeywell Forge—are challenging long-held assumptions about the best way you can achieve these three goals.

 

Globally, aircraft downtime costs airlines around $62 billion every year.

 

Embracing New Perspectives

To maximize uptime, operators must learn to understand the interrelated nature of modern aircraft components. They must view maintenance not as something that happens when faults occur, but that can be predicted. And they must streamline the way they provide that maintenance. For some, that means embracing maintenance service plans and the expertise and cost controls they provide.

Honeywell’s work on the Connected Aircraft—and our heritage in the aerospace and defense industry—gives us a unique perspective on new approaches for keeping aircraft off the ground and in the air.

We have more than 100 years of experience in high-stakes technology, products and services for aviation, defense and space. We not only understand aircraft, with solutions on nearly every aircraft in the world, but we understand every aspect of aviation operations. Let us put our experience to work helping you maximize your aircraft uptime.

Ready to Talk?

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

What is the cost of aircraft downtime?

A report by McKinsey reveals that despite the industry’s efforts to maximize aircraft uptime, the average airliner operates just 10.5 hours a day.[1] Estimates vary on financial costs, but one study reported that, globally, aircraft downtime costs airlines around $62 billion every year.[2]

For many operators, however, financial cost is not the most important factor. For air rescue, aerial firefighters, defense agencies and others who provide critical services, the cost of aircraft downtime can be mission failure or the loss of human life.

For business jet operators or airlines, downtime can damage a reputation and lead to a loss of future business.

The need to maximize mission readiness, deliver profits and return shareholder value is pushing the industry to find new and better ways of optimizing aircraft uptime.

What are the best ways to increase uptime?

Increasing uptime requires synchronization across aircraft operations. The uptime of any individual aircraft is the result of hundreds of small details coming together in exactly the right way—which makes uptime analysis a complex prospect. At the highest level, though, maximizing aircraft uptime requires doing three basic things:

  • Minimizing unscheduled maintenance
  • Streamlining maintenance operations
  • Reducing aircraft turnaround times
What technologies are helping aviation companies minimize maintenance downtime and reduce turnaround?

One of the biggest advancements driving increased uptime today is big data analytics, which delivers deep, informed insights to owners, operators and crews about virtually every system of the aircraft. Analytics makes the Connected Aircraft possible and gets information to the right people to make better decisions in real time.

Part of the Connected Aircraft is predictive, prescriptive maintenance, which enables crews to know when a component or system is faulty and provides information on when failure might occur and how to address the issue. That means crews can schedule the replacement or repair of faulty components before the issue grounds an aircraft. Workers can also order necessary parts and have them on hand to cut down on wait times for repairs. The Connected Aircraft also helps reduce turnaround times by providing ground crews with an unprecedented view of the turnaround process and a wealth of information that helps crews improve on-time performance and resource planning and utilization.

Why should I choose Honeywell for solutions that help increase aircraft uptime?

Our work on the Connected Aircraft—and our heritage in the aerospace and defense industry—gives us a unique perspective on new approaches for keeping aircraft off the ground and in the air. We have more than 100 years of experience in high-stakes technology, products and services for aviation, defense and space. We not only understand aircraft, with solutions on nearly every airliner in the world, but we understand every aspect of aviation operations. Let us put our experience to work helping you maximize your aircraft uptime.