Honeywell Helps Urban Students Get Hands-On STEM Experience

January 30, 2015


It’s amazing what corporations, government, educational institutions and non-profits can accomplish when they come together for a great cause.

The Kansas City Engineering Zone, which officially opened January 29, is a great example of community partnership to ensure urban students have a safe place and the resources to compete in the upcoming FIRST Robotics competition in March.

Honeywell and its customer the Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration donated approximately $300,000 worth of machining equipment, including mills, drills, and cutting machines, to ensure high school students at Kansas City’s inner city Paseo Academy and Lincoln Preparatory Academy schools had access to the necessary equipment.

“We are very excited to be involved, and donate this equipment from our federal customer,” said Robin Stubenhofer, Vice President of Engineering at Honeywell’s Federal Manufacturing & Technologies. “As a female engineer, looking out on this room, it’s great to see so many women going into STEM fields. If you need support, call Honeywell and ask for me, and I’ll talk to you.”

KC EZ was pioneered by the KC STEM Alliance, a collaborative network of educators, business partners and affiliates that inspires interest in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math careers. And it appears to be working.

Mame Dia, a freshman at Lincoln Prep, said, “This is an awesome experience. I’ve met some neat people, and I’m more confident. I want to go to Missouri University of Science & Technology to be a programming architect.”

While STEM subjects can be male dominated areas, Lincoln Prep actually has more females than males on their Robotics team.

Melina Richardson, a sophomore at Lincoln Prep and VP of her robotics team, says FIRST Robotics has taught her how to plan and run meetings, manage fundraisers, write grants and essays, and debate. She’s learned wiring and electrical engineering and says one of the great things about KC EZ is it brings professors, corporations and students together.