Engineers Recognized for 70 Years of Brilliance

February 27, 2015

Bill Hancock
Andrew Hieber
                     Bill Hancock                                                Andrew Hieber 

 

Two Honeywell Aerospace engineers with a combined total of more than 70 years of contributions to the company’s success were presented Lifetime Achievement Awards during Feb. 26 ceremonies in Phoenix. Bill Hancock and Andrew Hieber each received Honeywell’s highest engineering honor for a body of work that has had enormous impact on Honeywell and the larger aerospace industry.

Hancock is a senior fellow in the Crew Interface and Platform Systems group in Phoenix. During his 39-year career he has had a hand in developing flight deck displays for all kinds of aircraft and spacecraft including the aircraft information management system (AIMS) for the Boeing 777 and AIMS 2 for the 737, the multifunction electronic display system (MEDS) for the Space Shuttle and the cockpit displays for the Primus Epic integrated flight deck for business. He also has been a major contributor to Honeywell’s flight controls product line, including groundbreaking work on the Flight Control Electronics System for the Boeing 787.

“I still get excited when someone walks in the door with a new challenge or a tough problem to solve,” Hancock said. “We’re always looking for opportunities to squeeze more out of our hardware and software, make things faster and better, and deliver systems that meet the needs of our customers and the flight crews who rely on our systems.”

Hieber is a senior manager in the Materials and Process Engineering group, which is part of the Mechanical Center of Excellence in Phoenix. He has been with Honeywell for 32 years. A metallurgist, Hieber has played a leadership role in developing materials technologies that have contributed to many of the company’s largest and most successful propulsion engine and auxiliary power unit programs. He was the primary developer of Alloy 10, a proprietary alloy that can withstand much higher temperatures, which improves power density and fuel efficiency on turbine engines. The alloy is currently used on the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter APU and is being considered for various new engine programs.

“Being open minded is one of the best attributes an engineer – or anyone for that matter – can have,” Hieber said. “You have to be willing to look at everything, recognize what you don’t know and learn as you go along. You don’t always have all the data in the world to make a decision and you have to accept that. I’m a big fan of intuition.”