Honeywell by the Letters - EGI

August 4, 2016 | Author: Amanda Jensen

Honeywell’s EGI: Three Letters for Easy Directions

“I seriously don’t know what I’d do without GPS on my phone. I’d be completely lost without it.”

If I had a dime for every time my roommate said this to me, I’d be able to write a check and pay off the entirety of my student loan debt. I love her to death, but she’s pretty directionally-challenged. That being said, I think even those of us with a better sense of direction have relied on navigation systems and our smartphones at one point or another to get us where we need to be.

When I think about it, the same rules apply to aircraft – especially in the military. Pilots of these aircraft need to know where they are, but they also need to know things like attitude, altitude, linear/angular acceleration or velocity and their magnetic/true heading. This is where Honeywell’s embedded GPS inertial navigation system (INS) comes into play. That’s quite a mouthful, so we refer to it as EGI.

Roughly the size of a shoebox and weighing anywhere between 12.5 and 22 pounds, the EGI is small but mighty and extremely important to operators of military aircraft. Honeywell manufactures three different versions of their EGI: the H-764 for military aircraft, the FALCN which is essentially the little brother of the H-764, and the H-764 legacy which is built to be installed on legacy aircraft. When installed, EGI basically acts like a GPS or navigation system on steroids by providing them with many critical pieces of data about the ways an aircraft is moving through the air.

These EGI’s are being used on unmanned aircraft and can also be found on over 140 different military aircraft, including the UH-60 and CH-47. If those numbers and letters mean nothing to you, they're more commonly known as the Black Hawk and Chinook helicopters used by the United States Army. Recently, 220 new EGI’s were ordered for these two aircraft; a total of $18.4 million. The new units are expected to be delivered over 2017 and 2018.

While this is all part of Honeywell’s ongoing IDIQ EGI contract, the new order is pretty exciting. Not only does it illustrate the popularity and performance of Honeywell’s EGI’s, but it also showcases Honeywell’s ability to continually provide its customers with the tools and services they need to improve the safety and efficiency of their aircraft.

Amanda Jensen

Amanda Jensen

Amanda Jensen is a summer public relations and social media intern at Honeywell Aerospace. Amanda is originally from Minneapolis, but is a rising senior at Arizona State University where she is studying Journalism and Mass Communication. Go Sun Devils!

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